Psy 1012: General Psychology



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PSY 1012: General Psychology

Course Description: This course is an introduction to the field of psychology. It includes the history, scientific methodology, major theoretical schools of thought, various approaches to interpersonal functioning and human development. The effects of ethnicity, age, race and gender are integrated into the study of the discipline. This course partially satisfies the SBE 6A-10.30 writing requirements outlined in the General Education Requirements. Three hours weekly.

Dr. David Liebert, Professor & Department Chair

Office: PS 109 Phone: 727-712-5776 Cell: 813-546-1628 Liebert.David@SPCollege.edu

Term 0520/Fall, 2016

Section Days Times Location

663 MW 9:30-10:45 am BB 212

1392 TR 8:00-9:15 am PS 120

664 TR 9:30-10:45 am BB212

882 TR 11:00-12:15 pm PS 120

Major Learning Outcomes:

1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the historical roots of the science of psychology.

2. The student will demonstrate knowledge of research methods used in psychology.

3. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the major theories of psychology.

4. The student will demonstrate knowledge of self as both biological and social organism.

5. The student will demonstrate knowledge of universal stages of development and of individual differences.

6. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the effects of ethnicity, age, gender, and/or race on psychological functioning.
Course Objectives Stated in Performance Terms:

1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the historical roots of the science of psychology by:

a. identifying major theorists and schools of thought from the late 1800's to the present.

b. recognizing the contributions of major historical figures in psychology.

2. The student will demonstrate knowledge of research methods used in psychology by:

a. distinguishing among the descriptive (case study, naturalistic observation, survey), correlational and experimental approaches to behavioral research.

b. identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the research methods used in psychology.

3. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the major theories of psychology by:

a. recognizing the principles of the major theories, such as psychoanalytic, personality, humanistic, behavioral, cognitive and Gestalt.

b. recognizing the major contributors and research supporting each theory.

4. The student will demonstrate knowledge of self as both biological and social organism by:

a. recognizing how biology and environment impact behavior in areas such as sensation, perception, state of consciousness, emotion, language, intelligence, motivation, memory and learning.

b. recognizing the various approaches to interpersonal functioning.

c. identifying the criteria for classifying abnormal behavior and examining the medical and psychological models of therapy.

5. The student will demonstrate knowledge of universal stages of development and of individual differences by:

a. identifying stages of development as delineated by relevant theoretical approaches.

b. recognizing developmental findings in the domains of physical, cognitive, and social functioning.

c. recognizing issues of intelligence and personality that pertain to individual differences.

6. The student will demonstrate knowledge of the effects of ethnicity, age, gender, and/or race on psychological functioning by:

a. recognizing individual and group differences in behavior and cognitive processing.

b. identifying major issues emerging from research in areas such as intelligence, development, memory, states of consciousness, motivation, emotion, stress and health, personality and abnormal behavior.
Course Goal

The primary goal of this course is “student success” while developing an understanding of the science of psychology and its applications. To this end, I teach this course to ensure those students who intend to take additional psychology courses are well prepared and ready to actively participate in an advance curriculum. Yet, most students taking this course have no intention to major or minor in psychology (although many are surprised to find they have been captivated by the topic and change their major as a result). To this end, ample opportunity is taken in class to show how psychology can be of benefit in other courses too such as math, literature, art, government and history.


Required Material
All required material for this course is available is soft copy and has been posted in our MyCourses class page. The required writing assignment will require the purchase of material which the college bookstore can assist in helping students order.


  1. Liebert, D. (2016). It’s not about Freud, but it’s all about Freud: The development of contemporary psychology. DRAFT




  1. Other articles will be found in the class “Reader.”

Assignments & Grades


  1. Critical Book Review (CBR), 100 points. Students will be required to write a 1,000 word CBR to one of the following titles addressing the prompt provided following each title:

Option 1, Haruf, K. (2015). Our souls at night: A novel. New York: Knoph.

Ira Reiss, Professor Emeritus at the University of Minnesota, proposes a theory on love, suggesting love develops through stages. Apply an analysis of Louis and Addie’s relationship based on Reiss’ “Wheel Theory.”
Option 2, Liebert, D. (2014). Shrink wrapped: Stories from a psychologist’s unconscious. Abbeville, SC: Moonshine Cove Publishing.

This is a collection of short stories centering on various psychological themes. What single psychological orientation—psychoanalysis, humanistic or existential—best reflects the approach the author adopts?


Option 3, Moore, L. (1994). Who will run the frog hospital? A novel. New York: Vintage Books.

Many psychologists argue, following childhood, our personality becomes fixed, doesn’t change and over time we remain true to who we are. This story centers on Bernie’s bittersweet nostalgia as she reflects over the summer when she was 15 years old. Is Bernie, the adult, the same Bernie who was once 15? Think deeply on those elements that define us as you engage your discussion.


* The bookstore can assist is obtaining copies of titles. Students must submit a CBR is order to pass the class.

  1. Exam #s 1, 2 and 3 (75 points). Students will complete three examinations consisting of 65 multiple choice questions and one essay question. The exams will be noncumulative.



  1. Comprehensive Final Exam (75 points). Students will complete a 75 multiple choice exam at the end of the semester.



  1. Extra Credit (25 points). (a) Students having their CBR workshopped in the Learning Resources Center (LCR) will have 5 points added to their grade. (b) Students may elect to write a second CBR on one of the two remaining topics for up to 20 points of extra credit. This will be due no later than the last class meeting prior to the final exam.

(*) The lowest exam score is dropped.

Grading Scale: (300 Exams + 100 CBR [-75 lowest exam] = 325 points)

A = 325-292 B = 291- 260 C = 259-227 D= 226-195 F = 194 or less

Attendance

To be considered Actively Participating, a student can miss no more than four classes. If a student misses more than four classes prior to the 60% date and more than one assignment, he or she will be considered as Not Actively Participating. The last day to withdraw (W) for this class is OCTOBER 20, 2016. Students classified as “No Show: for the first two weeks will be administratively withdrawn. Students who are Not Actively Participating will be assigned a grade of WF. Students and instructors will automatically receive an email notification through their SPC email address whenever a withdrawal occurs. Always speak to your instructor is considering withdrawing from class.



Makeup Exams

There are no make-up exams; the lowest grade is dropped.



Weekly Agenda

All examinations occur at the end of the week, W/R. The CBR on M/T of the start of the week.

Key: R = “Required Reading”, S = “Suggested Reading”





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